Jordyn McGeachin is a young Melbourne-based artist using self-love, body-positivity, and unabashed sexual freedom as part of her subject matter. The other part shows how female millennials are grappling sexuality during the digital age. While anyone born before 1989 may quickly cast aside the notion of millennial angst, she gives an unflinching look into how modern technology is altering female sexuality.

Jordyn McGeachin

“Once I slept with someone. When I checked their phone afterward, they had Tinder notifications, and I was like, ‘Wow, yep, this is modern romance.’” —Jordyn McGeachin

Between Here and There

McGeachin’s watercolor series has technology taking center stage but in a very subtle way. Her subjects are usually flanked by various gadgets from smartphones to computers to the occasional sex toy. Each bedroom scene includes some type of a modern device showing that technology is always in reach, even while having sex—just like in real life.

Jordyn McGeachin

Jordyn McGeachin

Shaming Female Pleasure

Jordyn McGeachin finds herself sometimes self-censoring and cropping her images. Although Instagram is a fitting platform for a lot of artist’s these days, it also has a tendency for discrimination against feminist artists like Jordyn. McGeachin is seeing how female sexual empowerment and technology don’t always mix and is frustrated by the obvious double standard when it comes to showcasing her work. She recalls having one of her images removed because the young female is lying back and receiving oral pleasure from a partner.

 

Jordyn McGeachin

“I want to be able to share my work without worrying if a stranger will report it and have it removed. Why do bodies make [people] feel so uncomfortable?” — Jordyn McGeachin

Love Thy Selfie

McGeachin thinks women taking pleasure into their own hands is commonly associated as something shameful or taboo. And that women, all too often, make partners responsible for their sexual pleasure. Her illustrations show solo masturbation as healthy and enjoyable and no different than taking a bath.

 “I enjoy depicting women as sexual being rather than sexualizing them. It sucks [that] people still get weird about it.” — Jordyn McGeachin

Jordyn McGeachin

Jordyn McGeachin

See more work by Jordyn McGeachin here.

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